Soak it up

libutron:

Ocellate River Stingray - Potamotrygon motoro
Potamotrygon motor (Rajiformes - Potamotrygonidae) is a species of freshwater stingray endemic to, and widespread throughout, several South American river systems.
These stingrays can be distinguished from closely related species by the presence of orange to yellow dorsal eyespots, each surrounded by a black ring, with diameters larger than the eyes. Body color is otherwise greyish-brown. They are oval in shape with a robust tail, bearing a venomous spine. Maximum total length has been reported at 100 centimeters and maximum weight at 15 kg, though individuals tend to be much smaller.
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©Jason Hering | Locality: Cuiaba river, Matto Grosso, Amazon, Brazil - captive (2008)

libutron:

Ocellate River Stingray - Potamotrygon motoro

Potamotrygon motor (Rajiformes - Potamotrygonidae) is a species of freshwater stingray endemic to, and widespread throughout, several South American river systems.

These stingrays can be distinguished from closely related species by the presence of orange to yellow dorsal eyespots, each surrounded by a black ring, with diameters larger than the eyes. Body color is otherwise greyish-brown. They are oval in shape with a robust tail, bearing a venomous spine. Maximum total length has been reported at 100 centimeters and maximum weight at 15 kg, though individuals tend to be much smaller.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©Jason Hering | Locality: Cuiaba river, Matto Grosso, Amazon, Brazil - captive (2008)

libutron:

Kenyan Sand Boa - Eryx colubrinus
The sand boas are a group of generally small boids related to the rosy and rubber boas of North America, and together they make up the group (subfamily) called the Erycinae boas.
Also named East African Sand Boa, Eryx colubrinus (Boidae), is in build a typical sand boa, but colored orange or yellow with chocolate-brown to black splotches. The belly is white or cream. In the wild, this species ranges through Egypt, Sudan, Ethiopia, Kenya, Libya, Chad, Niger, Yemen, Tanzania, and Somalia. 
They eat small rodents and lizards, which they catch by lying in wait nearly buried in the dirt or sand until a potential meal walks by. Relatively small prey are grasped very quickly and suffocated not by constriction but by pulling them under the sand.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Cat Smith | Locality: not indicated (2007)

libutron:

Kenyan Sand Boa - Eryx colubrinus

The sand boas are a group of generally small boids related to the rosy and rubber boas of North America, and together they make up the group (subfamily) called the Erycinae boas.

Also named East African Sand Boa, Eryx colubrinus (Boidae), is in build a typical sand boa, but colored orange or yellow with chocolate-brown to black splotches. The belly is white or cream. In the wild, this species ranges through Egypt, Sudan, Ethiopia, Kenya, Libya, Chad, Niger, Yemen, Tanzania, and Somalia.

They eat small rodents and lizards, which they catch by lying in wait nearly buried in the dirt or sand until a potential meal walks by. Relatively small prey are grasped very quickly and suffocated not by constriction but by pulling them under the sand.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Cat Smith | Locality: not indicated (2007)

libutron:

Gray-headed Flying Fox - Pteropus poliocephalus
Endemic to the eastern coast of Australia, Pteropus poliocephalus (Chiroptera - Pteropodidae), is one of the largest bats in Australia, with a recorded wingspan exceeding 1.5 m. 
They do not echolocate, and therefore, the distinctive enlarged tragus or leaf-ornamentation found in most species of Microchiroptera is not present. Since they do not echolocate, they must rely on their large eyes for navigation and finding food. Despite popular belief, the flying fox has excellent vision and sense of smell.
This species is considered a pest of commercial fruit trees in parts of its range and animals are directly killed under license in orchards in New South Wales and Queensland. Threatened by loss of foraging and roosting habitat, Pteropus poliocephalus is listed as Vulnerable species on the IUCN Red List.  
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©Ofer Levy | Locality: Parramatta Park, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia (2012)

libutron:

Gray-headed Flying Fox - Pteropus poliocephalus

Endemic to the eastern coast of Australia, Pteropus poliocephalus (Chiroptera - Pteropodidae), is one of the largest bats in Australia, with a recorded wingspan exceeding 1.5 m. 

They do not echolocate, and therefore, the distinctive enlarged tragus or leaf-ornamentation found in most species of Microchiroptera is not present. Since they do not echolocate, they must rely on their large eyes for navigation and finding food. Despite popular belief, the flying fox has excellent vision and sense of smell.

This species is considered a pest of commercial fruit trees in parts of its range and animals are directly killed under license in orchards in New South Wales and Queensland. Threatened by loss of foraging and roosting habitat, Pteropus poliocephalus is listed as Vulnerable species on the IUCN Red List.  

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Ofer Levy | Locality: Parramatta Park, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia (2012)

libutron:

Victoria Crowned Pigeon - Goura victoria
The Victoria Crowned Pigeon, Goura victoria (Columbiformes - Columbidae), is a huge, blue-grey and maroon terrestrial pigeon, up to 74 cm, with spectacular white-tipped sagittal crest.
Goura victoria occurs in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea, where it is prized by hunters for meat and, to a lesser extent, for its feathers. The species is currently classified as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Frank Cornelissen | Locality: captive, Servion Zoo, Canton of Vaud, Switzerland (2011)

libutron:

Victoria Crowned Pigeon - Goura victoria

The Victoria Crowned Pigeon, Goura victoria (Columbiformes - Columbidae), is a huge, blue-grey and maroon terrestrial pigeon, up to 74 cm, with spectacular white-tipped sagittal crest.

Goura victoria occurs in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea, where it is prized by hunters for meat and, to a lesser extent, for its feathers. The species is currently classified as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Frank Cornelissen | Locality: captive, Servion Zoo, Canton of Vaud, Switzerland (2011)

lovethyselff:

Breakfast smoothie:

1 banana
1 apple
½ pomegranate
1 tbsp tahini
chia seeds
pumpkin seeds
water

(via beautifulpicturesofhealthyfood)